Institute for Religion & Critical Inquiry

Dr Lexi Eikelboom

Dr Lexi Eikelboom

Religion and Theology

Lexi.Eikelboom@acu.edu.au

B.A. (Canadian Mennonite University), M.St., D.Phil. (University of Oxford)

Lexi Eikelboom is a Research Fellow in the Institute for Religion and Critical Inquiry. She completed a doctorate in Theology (Modern Doctrine) at the University of Oxford in 2016. Before coming to ACU, she taught theology and interdisciplinary humanities at the John Wesley Honors College. Eikelboom’s research marshals perspectives from phenomenology, social theory, the arts and aesthetics, and liturgical and ritual studies to communicate the religious and theological significance of rhythm as a fundamental feature of human existence. She has published articles and chapters in The Heythrop Journal, Studies in Christian Ethics, and the collection Game Over, Good or Bad News? Eschatology in Question with de Gruyter.

Her first book, Rhythm: A Theological Category traces the ways in which philosophers and theologians as diverse as Erich Przywara and Giorgio Agamben have drawn on rhythm to describe reality and argues that, as a theoretical category capable of expressing metaphysical commitments yet shaped by the cultural rhythms in which those expressing such commitments are embedded, rhythm is the form according to which culture and embodied experience influence doctrine. The book is forthcoming with Oxford University Press in September 2018.

Key publications

Book
Rhythm: A Theological Category. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018.

Book chapters
‘Rhythmic Eschatology: What Poetry Teaches about the Nature of Time,’ in Game Over, Good or Bad News? Eschatology in Question. Theologische Bibliothek Töpelman series. Berlin: W. de Gruyter, 2017.

‘Redeeming Duality: Anthropological Split-ness and Embodied Soteriology’ in The Resounding Soul: Reflections on the Metaphysics and Vivacity of the Human Person, edited by Eric Austin Lee and Samuel Kimbriel. Eugene, Oregon: Wipf&Stock, 2015.

Journal articles
‘Erich Przywara and Giorgio Agamben: Rhythm as a Space for Dialogue between Catholic Metaphysics and Postmodernism,’ The Heythrop Journal 56. 2 (2014)

‘Why Stanley Hauerwas Needs Blaise Pascal: Sin, Anthropology, and Christian Witness.’ Studies in Christian Ethics 27. 4 (2014): 404-416.